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Huge Tomb found in Pella
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Cynisca



Joined: 01 Feb 2006
Posts: 605
Location: Living in Yorkshire UK - ê tan ê epi tas

PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2006 2:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi again,
Nicostrati would seem to be a male name.....there is a known name Nicostratus.
It seems to be a Greek name, although Nicostrati could be the Macedonian version or, of course, a feminine rendering.
I have found something else of interest....
The Greek dramatist, Aristophanes had a son called Nicostratus and in one of his plays 'Lysistrata', there was a female called Cleonice.
The female names are also used in modern day Macedon.
I would still go with the Antigona and Nicostrati from the ancestral names, Antigone and Stratoniki, it would certainly explain things....
An Antigone married to Pyrrhus, the King of Epirus, and who was also descended from Antipater, died around 295 possibly in childbirth. The child was called Ptolemy. Being of the Macedonian upper or ruling classes, it is likely she would be buried in Pella.
All very interesting.....and, of course, just theory right now.... Very Happy
regards
Cynisca
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philalexandros



Joined: 02 Dec 2005
Posts: 232
Location: Macedonia

PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2006 4:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

wow this is very interesting very high chance being Anitpater's family! thought that might be the case after some carefull thinking.
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Aniketos



Joined: 13 Nov 2005
Posts: 25
Location: USA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2006 3:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Even more exciting news! Cool

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20060216/sc_afp/greecearchaeology_060216191331

A huge wall, built (probably) by Cassander when he was King, has been found near Dion in the Mt. Olympus region. This wall was inspired by Alexander's glories.
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Cynisca



Joined: 01 Feb 2006
Posts: 605
Location: Living in Yorkshire UK - ê tan ê epi tas

PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2006 3:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aniketos wrote:
Even more exciting news! Cool

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20060216/sc_afp/greecearchaeology_060216191331

A huge wall, built (probably) by Cassander when he was King, has been found near Dion in the Mt. Olympus region. This wall was inspired by Alexander's glories.

Oooh.....this is definitely getting very interesting..I wonder what will be found next....... Rolling Eyes !
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Cynisca
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philalexandros



Joined: 02 Dec 2005
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Location: Macedonia

PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2006 4:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Absoletuly Wink wow once again terrific news.
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Adriv



Joined: 17 Jan 2005
Posts: 1144
Location: Maryland, USA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2006 2:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah.... I would love to see some pics.

Oh, Alexander you were/are the greatest... *sigh* Smile
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philalexandros



Joined: 02 Dec 2005
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Location: Macedonia

PostPosted: Sat Feb 18, 2006 8:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So would I, I wonder when they will show some pictures of it,or if they ever will.
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Cymoril



Joined: 23 Mar 2005
Posts: 46
Location: Belgrade

PostPosted: Sat Feb 18, 2006 8:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wonderful and above all INTRIGUING news!
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apelles



Joined: 12 Mar 2005
Posts: 1152

PostPosted: Sat Feb 18, 2006 2:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cynisca wrote:
Hi again,
Nicostrati would seem to be a male name.....there is a known name Nicostratus.
It seems to be a Greek name, although Nicostrati could be the Macedonian version or, of course, a feminine rendering.
I have found something else of interest....
The Greek dramatist, Aristophanes had a son called Nicostratus and in one of his plays 'Lysistrata', there was a female called Cleonice.
The female names are also used in modern day Macedon.
I would still go with the Antigona and Nicostrati from the ancestral names, Antigone and Stratoniki, it would certainly explain things....
An Antigone married to Pyrrhus, the King of Epirus, and who was also descended from Antipater, died around 295 possibly in childbirth. The child was called Ptolemy. Being of the Macedonian upper or ruling classes, it is likely she would be buried in Pella.
All very interesting.....and, of course, just theory right now.... Very Happy
regards
Cynisca


Would that be the Pyrrhus who gave his name to the term"Pyrrhic victory" or is it another one?Thanks for the info.---fascinating.
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Cynisca



Joined: 01 Feb 2006
Posts: 605
Location: Living in Yorkshire UK - ê tan ê epi tas

PostPosted: Sun Feb 19, 2006 1:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

apelles wrote:

Would that be the Pyrrhus who gave his name to the term"Pyrrhic victory" or is it another one?Thanks for the info.---fascinating.

Yes, it seems to be him.....!
Well, someone thinks these burials may be connected to the Lyngistes, Alexander's grandmother Eurydice, mother of Phillip II was from these people.
I don't know if it is theory or he has some information. If some of the names are 'known' the archaeologists will not, of course, release any information until they are sure...
Hephaestion's father was called Amyntor, Phillip II's father and Eurydice's husband was Amyntas. Amyntor is thought to be a Greek version of Amyntas, although it was a common name......
Hephaestion's family were thought to have come from Pella.
This is the tomb of an Amyntas in what was Telmessos, now Turkey...a king or govenor of the area during the 4th century bcehttp://www.hat.net/album/middle_east/001_turkey/day_08_fethiye/tomb_of_amyntas/detail001.htm another one with some information...http://www.trekearth.com/gallery/Middle_East/Turkey/Aegean/photo254628.htm he could even be Hephaestion's father..... Wink
regards
Cynisca
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carabest



Joined: 14 Nov 2005
Posts: 39

PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2006 5:08 am    Post subject: huge tomb found in pella Reply with quote

I remeber reading somewhere that Hephaistion's father was named Amyntas. Knowing the ancient Macedonians (as we all do!) it is probable that the man was dead before they left for Asia or else he would have joined too. This gets more and more interesting. Anyone know if they are taking volunteers for the dig?
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Cynisca



Joined: 01 Feb 2006
Posts: 605
Location: Living in Yorkshire UK - ê tan ê epi tas

PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2006 12:28 pm    Post subject: Re: huge tomb found in pella Reply with quote

carabest wrote:
I remeber reading somewhere that Hephaistion's father was named Amyntas. Knowing the ancient Macedonians (as we all do!) it is probable that the man was dead before they left for Asia or else he would have joined too. This gets more and more interesting. Anyone know if they are taking volunteers for the dig?

These are the only European ones I have found so far.....http://archaeology.about.com/od/europeandigs/
There may be more news after the Archaeological Conference publishes their findings....
regards
Cynisca
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Cynisca



Joined: 01 Feb 2006
Posts: 605
Location: Living in Yorkshire UK - ê tan ê epi tas

PostPosted: Sat Oct 27, 2007 11:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been looking for updates on these burials, but cannot find anything.
Had anybody else any more news...?
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Cynisca



Joined: 01 Feb 2006
Posts: 605
Location: Living in Yorkshire UK - ê tan ê epi tas

PostPosted: Sat Sep 13, 2008 11:21 am    Post subject: Greek dig unearths secrets of Alexander the Great's golden e Reply with quote

Wow....! Shocked Very Happy
It would be more than 100 years at least until Alexander the Great led the forces of Macedonia to conquer the Hellenistic world.
But, even in its early days, the Greek kingdom's warriors were already an imposing sight on the battlefield.
A dig in an ancient burial ground in Alexander's birthplace of Pella, northern Greece, has unearthed the graves of 20 warriors in battle dress, a find which archaeologists say sheds fresh light on the development of Macedonian culture.
Nine of the graves dated to the late classical or early Hellenistic period, around the death of Alexander the Great in 323BC.
(It is unclear if those are from Pella or Thessaloniki...)
Page link:-Tomb
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joanna



Joined: 02 Feb 2005
Posts: 1270
Location: Greece/USA/Italy/UK/

PostPosted: Wed Oct 01, 2008 2:40 pm    Post subject: Re: Greek dig unearths secrets of Alexander the Great's gold Reply with quote

Cynisca wrote:
Wow....! Shocked Very Happy
It would be more than 100 years at least until Alexander the Great led the forces of Macedonia to conquer the Hellenistic world.
But, even in its early days, the Greek kingdom's warriors were already an imposing sight on the battlefield.
A dig in an ancient burial ground in Alexander's birthplace of Pella, northern Greece, has unearthed the graves of 20 warriors in battle dress, a find which archaeologists say sheds fresh light on the development of Macedonian culture.
Nine of the graves dated to the late classical or early Hellenistic period, around the death of Alexander the Great in 323BC.
(It is unclear if those are from Pella or Thessaloniki...)
Page link:-Tomb



Very interesting, Cristina. Do you know about these tombs?
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