Go to the alexander-the-great.co.uk homepage
alexander-the-great.co.uk
Talk about the Oliver Stone movie "Alexander"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

MACEDONIAN ETYMOLOGY OF FILM CHARACTERS
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    alexander-the-great.co.uk Forum Index -> Discuss 'Alexander' the Movie - Pre-Release
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
bazil



Joined: 17 Feb 2004
Posts: 64

PostPosted: Fri Apr 30, 2004 6:38 pm    Post subject: MACEDONIAN ETYMOLOGY OF FILM CHARACTERS Reply with quote

Here is the meaning of the names of Alexander and other ancient Macedonians:

ALEXANDROS - Ancient Greek (ALEXANDER Latinized)
Pronounced: al-eg-ZAN-dur

From the Greek name Alexandros, which meant ‘defending men’ from Greek alexein ‘to defend, protect, help’ and aner ‘man’ (genitive andros). Alexander the Great, King of Macedon, is the most famous bearer of this name. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. The name was borne by five kings of Macedon.

PHILIPPOS - Ancient Greek (PHILIP Latinized)

Pronounced: FIL-ip
From the Greek name Philippos which means ‘friend of horses’, composed of the elements philos ‘friend’ and hippos ‘horse’. The name was borne by five kings of Macedon, including Philip II the father of Alexander the Great.

AMYNTAS - Ancient Greek

Derived from Greek amyntor meaning ‘defender’. The name was borne by three kings of Macedon.

ANTIGONOS - Ancient Greek (ANTIGONUS Latinized)
Pronounced: an-TIG-o-nus

Means ‘like the ancestor’ from Greek anti ‘like’ and goneus ‘ancestor’. This was the name of one of Alexander the Great's generals. After Alexander died, he took control of most of Asia Minor. He was known as Antigonus ‘Monophthalmos’ ('the One-Eyed'). Antigonos II (ruled 277-239 BC) was known as ‘Gonatos’ (‘knee, kneel’).

ANTIPATROS - Ancient Greek (ANTIPATER Latinized)
Pronounced: an-TI-pa-tur

From the Greek name Antipatros, which meant ‘like the father’ from Greek anti ‘like’ and pater ‘father’. This was the name of an officer of Alexander the Great, who became the regent of Macedon during Alexander's absence.

ARGAIOS - Greek Mythology (ARGUS Latinized)

Derived from Greek argos meaning ‘glistening, shining’. In Greek myth this name belongs to both the man who built the Argo and a man with a hundred eyes. The name was borne by three kings of Macedon.

DEMETRIOS - Ancient Greek (DEMETRIUS Latinized)

Latin form of the Greek name Demetrios, which was derived from the name of the Greek goddess Demeter. Kings of Macedon and the Seleucid kingdom have had this name. Demetrios I (ruled 309-301 BC) was known as ‘Poliorketes’ (the ‘Beseiger’).

KARANOS - Ancient Greek (CARANUS Latinized)

Derived from the archaic Greek word ‘koiranos’ or ‘karanon", meaning ‘ruler’, ‘leader’ or ‘king’. Both words stem from the same archaic Doric root ‘kara’ meaning head, hence leader, royal master. The word ‘koiranos’ already had the meaning of ruler or king in Homer. Karanos is the name of the founder of the Argead dynasty of the Kings of Macedon.

KOINOS - Ancient Greek

Derived from Greek koinos meaning ‘usual, common’. An Argead king of Macedon in the 8th century BC.

LYSIMACHOS - Ancient Greek (LYSIMACHUS Latinized)

Means ‘a loosening of battle’ from Greek lysis ‘a release, loosening’ and mache ‘battle’. This was the name of one of Alexander the Great's generals. After Alexander's death Lysimachus took control of Thrace.


MENELAOS - Greek Mythology (MENELAUS Latinized)

Means ‘withstanding the people’ from Greek meno ‘to last, to withstand’ and laos ‘the people’. In Greek legend he was a king of Sparta and the husband of Helen. When his wife was taken by Paris, the Greeks besieged the city of Troy in an effort to get her back. After the war Menelaus and Helen settled down to a happy life. Macedonian naval commander during the wars of the Diadochi and brother of Ptolemy Lagos.

ORESTES - Greek Mythology
Pronounced: o-RES-teez

Derived from Greek orestais meaning ‘of the mountains’. In Greek myth he was the son of Agamemnon. He killed his mother Clytemnestra after she killed his father. The name of a king of Macedon (ruled 399-396 BC).

PAUSANIAS - Ancient Greek

King of Macedon in 393 BC. Pausanias was also the name of the Spartan king at the Battle of Plataea in 479 BC and of the Greek traveller, geographer and writer whose most famous work is ‘Description of Greece’, and also the name of the man who assassinated Philip II of Macedon in 336 BC.

PERDIKKAS - Ancient Greek (PERDICCAS Latinized)

Derived from Greek perdika meaning ‘partridge’. Perdikkas I is presented as founder of the kingdom of Macedon in Herodotus 8.137. The name was borne by three kings of Macedon.

PERSEUS - Greek Mythology
Pronounced: PUR-see-us

Possibly derived from Greek pertho meaning ‘to destroy’. Perseus was a hero in Greek legend. He killed Medusa, who was so ugly that anyone who gazed upon her was turned to stone, by looking at her in the reflection of his shield and slaying her in her sleep. The name of a king of Macedon (ruled 179-168 BC).

PTOLEMEOS - Ancient Greek (PTOLEMY Latinized)
Pronounced: TAWL-e-mee

Derived from Greek polemeios meaning ‘aggressive’ or ‘warlike’. Ptolemy was the name of several Greco-Egyptian rulers of Egypt, all descendents of Ptolemy I, one of Alexander the Great’s generals. This was also the name of a Greek astronomer. Ptolemy ‘Keraunos’ (ruled 281-279 BC) is named after the lighting bolt thrown by Zeus.

PYRRHOS - Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology (PYRRHUS Latinized)
Pronounced: PIR-us

Derived from Greek pyrros meaning ‘flame-coloured, red’, related to pyr ‘fire’. This was another name of Neoptolemus the son of Achilles. The name of a king of Macedon (ruled 287-285 BC). This was also the name of a 3rd-century BC king of Epirus.

TYRIMMAS - Greek Mythology

Tyrimmas, an Argead king of Macedon and son of Coenus. Also known as Temenus. In Greek mythology, Temenus was the son of Aristomaches and a great-great grandson of Herakles. He became king of Argos. Tyrimmas was also a man from Epirus and father of Evippe, who consorted with Odysseus (Parthenius of Nicaea, Love Romances, 3.1)


QUEENS AND ROYAL FAMILY

EURYDIKE - Greek Mythology (EURYDICE Latinized)

Means ‘wide justice’ from Greek eurys ‘wide’ and dike ‘justice’. In Greek myth she was the wife of Orpheus. Her husband tried to rescue her from Hades, but he failed when he disobeyed the condition that he not look back upon her on their way out. Name of the mother of Philip II of Macedon.

KLEOPATRA - Ancient Greek (CLEOPATRA Latinized), English
Pronounced: klee-o-PAT-ra

Means ‘glory of the father’ from Greek kleos ‘glory’ combined with patros ‘of the father’. This was the name of queens of Egypt from the Ptolemaic royal family, including Cleopatra VII, the mistress of both Julius Caesar and Mark Antony. After being defeated by Augustus she committed suicide by allowing herself to be bitten by an asp. Also the name of a bride of Philip II of Macedon.

THESSALONIKI - Ancient Greek

Means ‘victory over the Thessalians’, from the name of the region of Thessaly and niki, meaning ‘victory’. Name of Alexander the Great’s step sister and of the city of Thessaloniki which was named after her in 315 BC.

GENERALS, SOLDIERS, PHILOSOPHERS AND OTHERS

ARISTOTELES - Ancient Greek (ARISTOTLE Latinized)
Pronounced: AR-is-taw-tul

From the Greek name Aristoteles which meant ‘the best purpose’, derived from aristos ‘best’ and telos ‘purpose, aim". This was the name of an important Greek philosopher who made contributions to logic, metaphysics, ethics and biology among many other fields.

ARISTON - Ancient Greek

Derived from Greek aristos meaning ‘the best’. The name of a Macedonian officer on campaign with Alexander the Great (Arrian, Anabasis, Book II, 9 and Book III, 11, 14).

HEPHAISTION - Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Derived from Hephaistos (‘Hephaestus’ Latinized) who in Greek mythology was the god of fire and forging and one of the twelve Olympian deities. Hephaistos in Greek denotes a ‘furnace’ or ‘volcano’. Hephaistion was the companion and closest friend of Alexander the Great. He was also known as ‘Philalexandros’ (‘friend of Alexander’).


KLEITOS - Ancient Greek (CLEITUS Latinized)

Means ‘splendid, famous’ in Greek. This was the name of one of Alexander the Great's generals.

PHILOTAS - Ancient Greek

From Greek philotes meaning ‘friendship’. Son of Parmenion and a commander of Alexander the Great’s Companion cavalry.

PHILOXENOS - Ancient Greek

Meaning ‘friend of strangers’ derived from Greek philos meaning friend and xenos meaning ‘stranger, foreigner’. The name of a Macedonian soldier on campaign with Alexander the Great (Arrian, Anabasis, Book III, 6).

THAIS - Ancient Greek

Possibly meaning ‘bandage’ in Greek. This was the name of a companion of Alexander the Great.

BUCEPHALUS - Ancient Greek

The name of the horse of Alexander the Great. The name derives from the two Greek words vous (‘ox’) and kephali (‘head’), meaning the horse with a head as big as an ox’s head.


MISCELLANEOUS

AEGAI Ancient Greek
Derives from the Greek word Aega meaning ‘goat’. The name of the first capital of the ancient kingdom of Macedonia. Karanos, the first king of Macedonia, who in order to find a place for the capital of the kingdom, followed a herd of goats (aegai) and settled the capital at the place were the goats had stopped. The goat appears as a symbol on Alexander I's coins (E. N. Borza, In the Shadow of Olympus (1990[1992]) 127-128 and 285-286 [coins]; N.G.L. Hammond, History of Macedonia II [1979] Cool.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Ptolemy V



Joined: 04 Jan 2004
Posts: 111

PostPosted: Sat May 01, 2004 7:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice one Bazil - I was about to post this etymology as well 'cause "Ptolemy Lagos" on that other forum is me! Nevertheless, never mind, I'm happy for people to post my compilation.

Some of the etymologies I got from a site called "behindthename" while the rest are based on my own research and knowledge of Greek.

When I get time, I also wanted to pick out from Arrian's Anabasis some more names of Macedonian officers and generals and provide their etymology.

Just to provide some brief additions:

Glaucus - means "grey-green" in Greek. The name of an officer in Alexander's army

Also Meleagros comes from the Greek "Meleagris" which means "pheasant".
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dynamo



Joined: 15 Mar 2004
Posts: 289
Location: GB

PostPosted: Sat May 01, 2004 9:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ptomely V wrote:
Anabasis


as in THE Anabasis.

Xenophon's march of the 10 thousand?

It's a good. I read it last year found it abit annoying towards the end with the constant rear gaurd skirmishes and just the same thing going on again and again and you know that they are going to get to the Black sea ok etcetc. But it was still damn good
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Ptolemy V



Joined: 04 Jan 2004
Posts: 111

PostPosted: Sat May 01, 2004 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dynamo wrote:
ptomely V wrote:
Anabasis


as in THE Anabasis.

Xenophon's march of the 10 thousand?

It's a good.


Yes it is a very good read - and so is Arrian's "Anabasis of Alexander". BTW "anabasis" means a "journey" or "expedition".
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
bazil



Joined: 17 Feb 2004
Posts: 64

PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2004 2:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

LOL. You caught me plagiarizing, Ptolemy V! Shocked I made a few changes and passed it off as mine. I was impressed with the information. Some of it I knew and some of it I didn't.

Just so everybody knows, the etymology information in my post is actually from Ptolemy V.

Peace, my fellow Greek.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rhemy



Joined: 19 Feb 2004
Posts: 171
Location: Mustafaar

PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2004 4:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just for fun:

Emytology For:

BASIL Derived from Greek basileus meaning "king". Saint Basil the Great was a 4th-century bishop who was one of the fathers of the early Christian church. This was also the name of two Byzantine emperors

KEVIN Anglicized form of the Irish name Caoimhín, derived from the older Irish Coemgen, composed of the Old Irish elements coem "kind, gentle, handsome" and gein "birth". Saint Caoimhin established a monastery in Ireland and is the patron saint of Dublin.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Ptolemy V



Joined: 04 Jan 2004
Posts: 111

PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2004 8:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

bazil wrote:

Peace, my fellow Greek.


Very Happy

Peace to you too baz...

BTW feel free to post the etymology elsewhere - good educational material.

Rhemy wrote:

BASIL Derived from Greek basileus meaning "king". Saint Basil the Great was a 4th-century bishop who was one of the fathers of the early Christian church. This was also the name of two Byzantine emperors

KEVIN Anglicized form of the Irish name Caoimhín, derived from the older Irish Coemgen, composed of the Old Irish elements coem "kind, gentle, handsome" and gein "birth". Saint Caoimhin established a monastery in Ireland and is the patron saint of Dublin.


Nice one Rhemy! Wink Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dynamo



Joined: 15 Mar 2004
Posts: 289
Location: GB

PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2004 9:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Unfourtubately I do not have anything to include emytology wise for this period. Everything I know the roots from are mainly old English, ANglo-Saxon, French or Latin in origin. Oh well.

It's an interesting topic though. Keep them coming.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Ptolemy V



Joined: 04 Jan 2004
Posts: 111

PostPosted: Tue May 04, 2004 1:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since I apparently have "no life" and "nothing better to do", heres a list of the ancient kings of Macedon, their dynasties and the dates they ruled - hope it is of interest to some forum members. BTW, I suppose if I gave an "alternate" etymology I'll be receiving "slaps on the back" and a "well done" - gee, I might even have a life then!

KINGS OF ANCIENT MACEDONIA
ARGEAD DYNASTY
• Karanos (c. Late 9th/Early 8th Cent.)
• Koinos (c. Mid-8th Cent.)
• Tyrimmas (c. Late 8th/Early 7th Cent.)
• Perdikkas I (c. 670-652)
• Argaios I (652-621)
• Philip I (621-588)
• Aeropos I (588-568)
• Alketas (568-40)
• Amyntas I (540-498)
• Alexander I (c. 498-454)
• Perdikkas II (c. 454-413)
• Archelaus (413-399)
• Orestes (399-396)
• Aeropos II (396-393)
• Pausanias (393)
• Amyntas II the Little (393)
• Amyntas III (392-370)
• Argaios II (390)
• Alexander II (370-368)
• Ptolemy Alorites (368-365)
• Perdikkas III (365-359)
• Philip II (359-336)
• Alexander III the Great (336-323)
• Philip III Arrhidaios (323-317)
• Alexander IV Aegeos (323-309)
RIVAL KINGS: 309-301 B.C.
• Kassander
• Antigonos I Monophthalmos
• Demetrios I Poliorketes
• Lysimachos
• Seleukos Soter
• Ptolemy Lagos
ANTIPATRID DYNASTY
• Kassander (301-297)
• Philip IV (297)
• Antipater (297-294)
• Alexander V (297-294)
RIVAL RULERS
• Demetrius I Poliorketes (294-287)
• Pyrrhos (287-285)
• Lysimachos (285-281)
• Ptolemy Keraunos (281-279)
ANARCHY
• Meleager (279)
• Antipater Etesias (279)
• Sosthenes (279-277)
ANTIGONID DYNASTY
• Antigonos II Gonatas (277-239)
• Demetrios II (239-229)
• Antigonos III Doson (229-222)
• Philip V (222-179)
• Perseus (179-168)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Kevin
Site Admin


Joined: 30 Sep 2003
Posts: 630
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Wed May 05, 2004 1:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As some of you will know, I've just deleted a load of posts from this thread. I've lost any patience I did have with some of you and I don't need much in the way of an excuse to make sure you don't post again. Next time I delete a post I'll delete the user account for the person who made the post too, which means you've wasted your time in the first place as no-one will see ANY of your posts.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
ChristianMacedon



Joined: 08 Apr 2004
Posts: 211
Location: Portsmouth, United Kingdom

PostPosted: Thu May 06, 2004 4:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Here is the meaning of the names of Alexander and other ancient Macedonians:

you mean the greek meaning Wink of Alexander and the Macedonians
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Ptolemy V



Joined: 04 Jan 2004
Posts: 111

PostPosted: Thu May 06, 2004 11:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ChristianMacedon wrote:
Quote:
Here is the meaning of the names of Alexander and other ancient Macedonians:

you mean the greek meaning Wink of Alexander and the Macedonians


No, the meaning in English when translating the Greek words that make up their names. Wink Very Happy Razz
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ChristianMacedon



Joined: 08 Apr 2004
Posts: 211
Location: Portsmouth, United Kingdom

PostPosted: Fri May 07, 2004 12:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
No, the meaning in English when translating the Greek words that make up their names

yes,the greek meaning Laughing i hope i am clear now.
ie. greek words(alexandros,buchefalos etc) and the meaning behind it in greek.right?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Ptolemy V



Joined: 04 Jan 2004
Posts: 111

PostPosted: Fri May 07, 2004 4:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ChristianMacedon wrote:
Quote:
No, the meaning in English when translating the Greek words that make up their names

yes,the greek meaning Laughing i hope i am clear now.
ie. greek words(alexandros,buchefalos etc) and the meaning behind it in greek.right?


Yes, the Greek names/words have a meaning in the Greek language which I have then translated into English.

For example, the name "Philoxenos" is made up of two words "Philo" and "Xenos". "Philo" means 'friend' and "Xenos" means 'stranger'. So the name means 'friend of strangers'.
http://www.merriam-webster.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=philo&x=17&y=8
http://www.merriam-webster.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=xeno&x=13&y=17

Similarly, the name "Xenophon" means 'strange voice' - "Xeno" meaning 'stranger' and "Phon" meaning 'voice' (the modern day English "phone" is derived from this Greek word - e.g phonetic, telephone).
http://www.merriam-webster.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=xeno&x=13&y=17
http://www.merriam-webster.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=phone&x=11&y=10

So whats your point?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MACEDONIC



Joined: 04 May 2004
Posts: 77
Location: GREECE

PostPosted: Fri May 07, 2004 2:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I also wonder.....Hmmm!!!What is ur point Christian?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    alexander-the-great.co.uk Forum Index -> Discuss 'Alexander' the Movie - Pre-Release All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Page 1 of 4

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum



Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group